I Too or I, Too? (Comma Rules)

Understanding the correct usage of “I too” or “I, too” in sentences is essential for clear and effective communication. This guide will provide you with straightforward rules and examples to help you determine when to use a comma with “I too.”

When to Use “I too” or “I, Too”

When to Use "I too" or "I, Too"

Rule 1: Expressing Agreement or Similarity

Correct Usage:

  • “I love reading novels.” “I, too, love reading novels.”
  • “I can join the meeting.” “I, too, can join the meeting.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I love reading novels.” “I too love reading novels.”
  • “I can join the meeting.” “I too can join the meeting.”

Explanation: Use “I, too,” with commas when you’re agreeing with someone or showing similarity. The commas highlight the addition of your agreement or shared trait.

Rule 2: Adding Emphasis Without Interruption

Correct Usage:

  • “I too want to travel the world someday.”
  • “I too believe in second chances.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I, too want to travel the world someday.”
  • “I, too believe in second chances.”

Explanation: When “too” directly follows “I” without interrupting the sentence, no comma is needed. This structure is more straightforward and emphasizes a personal statement or belief.

Rule 3: Beginning a Sentence

Beginning a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • “I, too, am interested in learning more about this topic.”
  • “I, too, have experienced something similar.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I too, am interested in learning more about this topic.”
  • “I too have experienced something similar.”

Explanation: When starting a sentence with “I, too,” to express agreement or shared experience, use commas to set off “too.”

Rule 4: Concluding a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • “They said it was a remarkable movie. I think so, too.”
  • “Everyone passed the exam. I did, too.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “They said it was a remarkable movie. I think so too.”
  • “Everyone passed the exam. I did too.”

Explanation: When “too” is used at the end of a sentence to express agreement or inclusion, it is often preceded by a comma for clarity and emphasis.

Rule 5: Emphasizing an Addition

Emphasizing an Addition

Correct Usage:

  • “I, too, was surprised by the news.”
  • “I, too, have made that mistake before.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I too was surprised by the news.”
  • “I too have made that mistake before.”

Explanation: Use “I, too,” with commas to emphasize that you’re adding to the list of people who have experienced something or feel a certain way.

Read More: Do You Use a Comma With “Not Only…But Also”?

Rule 6: Without Interrupting the Flow

Correct Usage:

  • “I too wish for peace.”
  • “I too am committed to this cause.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I, too wish for peace.”
  • “I, too am committed to this cause.”

Explanation: When “too” follows “I” without needing to emphasize an interruption or an addition, omit the comma to maintain the flow of the sentence.

Rule 7: In Formal Writing

Correct Usage:

  • “In addition to my colleagues, I, too, support this initiative.”
  • “Like my peers, I, too, have observed this trend.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “In addition to my colleagues, I too support this initiative.”
  • “Like my peers, I too have observed this trend.”

Explanation: In formal writing, using “I, too,” with commas can add a level of sophistication and clarity, especially when expressing agreement or addition.

Rule 8: In Informal Contexts

Correct Usage:

  • “Me too.”
  • “I wanna go too!”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “Me, too.”
  • “I, wanna go too!”

Explanation: Informal speech often omits commas for brevity and simplicity, especially in quick responses or casual dialogue.

Rule 9: To Clarify the Meaning

Correct Usage:

  • “Not only did they apologize, but I, too, received a full refund.”
  • “She not only thanked me but also said she, too, would help.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “Not only did they apologize, but I too received a full refund.”
  • “She not only thanked me but also said she too would help.”

Explanation: Use commas with “I, too,” to clarify the sentence structure and meaning, particularly in complex sentences.

Rule 10: When “Too” Is Unnecessary

Correct Usage:

  • “I also agree.”
  • “I share that opinion.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I, too, agree.”
  • “I, too, share that opinion.”

Explanation: Sometimes, replacing “too” with “also” or rephrasing can avoid the need for commas and make the sentence clearer.

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