Is There a Comma After “Currently”?

The use of “currently” in sentences is widespread, serving to indicate something happening at the present time. However, whether to follow it with a comma depends on its position and function within a sentence.

This guide outlines the rules for using a comma after “currently,” complete with correct and incorrect examples for clarity.

When to Use a Comma After “Currently”

When to Use a Comma After "Currently"

Rule 1: Beginning of a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • Currently, the office is closed for renovations.
  • Currently, she is leading the project team.

Incorrect Usage:

  • Currently the office is closed for renovations.
  • Currently she is leading the project team.

Explanation: When “currently” starts a sentence, it is usually followed by a comma to separate it from the main clause.

Rule 2: Middle of a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • The office is, currently, under renovation.
  • She is, currently, the project’s lead.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office is currently, under renovation.
  • She is currently, the project’s lead.

Explanation: If “currently” is inserted in the middle of a sentence to add information or emphasis, it should be enclosed by commas.

Rule 3: Before “Currently” in the Middle of a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • The office, currently under renovation, will reopen next month.
  • The team, currently leading the league, plays tomorrow.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office currently, under renovation, will reopen next month.
  • The team currently, leading the league, plays tomorrow.

Explanation: When “currently” precedes a descriptive phrase in the middle of a sentence, a comma is not needed immediately after it but before it.

Read More: Do You Put a Comma Before “Even”?

Rule 4: No Comma When “Currently” Modifies a Verb Directly

Correct Usage:

  • The company is currently expanding its operations.
  • She is currently studying for her exams.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The company is currently, expanding its operations.
  • She is currently, studying for her exams.

Explanation: When “currently” directly modifies a verb without interrupting the sentence flow, no comma is used.

Rule 5: End of a Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • The office is under renovation currently.
  • She is leading the project team currently.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office is under renovation, currently.
  • She is leading the project team, currently.

Explanation: When “currently” is used at the end of a sentence to modify the verb, it generally does not require a comma before it.

Rule 6: “Currently” with Conjunctions

Correct Usage:

  • The office is, currently, closed, and it will reopen next month.
  • She is, currently, the project’s lead, but she will soon be promoted.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office is currently, closed, and it will reopen next month.
  • She is currently, the project’s lead, but she will soon be promoted.

Explanation: When “currently” is used with conjunctions to add emphasis in the middle of a sentence, it should be enclosed by commas if it interrupts the sentence flow.

Rule 7: “Currently” for Emphasis Without Commas

Correct Usage:

  • The company currently leads the market.
  • They currently occupy first place in the standings.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The company, currently, leads the market.
  • They, currently, occupy first place in the standings.

Explanation: If “currently” is used for emphasis without interrupting the natural flow of the sentence, no commas are needed.

Rule 8: “Currently” in a Compound Sentence

Correct Usage:

  • The office is currently closed, and the team is working remotely.
  • She is currently studying, but she will take a break soon.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office is currently, closed, and the team is working remotely.
  • She is currently, studying, but she will take a break soon.

Explanation: In compound sentences, “currently” does not need a comma if it directly modifies a verb before the conjunction.

Rule 9: “Currently” in Introductory Phrases

Correct Usage:

  • Currently under renovation, the office will reopen next month.
  • Currently leading the project, she has introduced innovative ideas.

Incorrect Usage:

  • Currently, under renovation, the office will reopen next month.
  • Currently, leading the project, she has introduced innovative ideas.

Explanation: When “currently” starts an introductory phrase describing the subject, it is not followed by a comma.

Rule 10: “Currently” for Clarity

Correct Usage:

  • The office, currently closed for renovations, is located downtown.
  • The team, currently first in the league, has improved significantly.

Incorrect Usage:

  • The office currently, closed for renovations, is located downtown.
  • The team currently, first in the league, has improved significantly.

Explanation: Use commas around “currently” when it provides essential clarifying information within a sentence.

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