Me Too or Me, Too? (Comma Rules)

Understanding the correct usage of “Me too” or “Me, too” in sentences is crucial for clear communication. This guide will walk you through the rules and scenarios for using commas with “Me too” in English. Each rule is accompanied by correct and incorrect examples to enhance comprehension.

When to Use “Me Too” or “Me, Too?”

When to Use "Me Too" or "Me, Too

Rule 1: Agreeing with a Statement

Correct Usage:

  • “I love ice cream.” “Me too.”
  • “I can’t wait for the weekend.” “Me too.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I love ice cream.” “Me, too.”
  • “I can’t wait for the weekend.” “Me, too.”

Explanation: When agreeing with someone’s statement, “Me too” is often used without a comma for informal communication.

Rule 2: Emphasizing Agreement

Correct Usage:

  • “I think this movie is fantastic!” “Me, too!”
  • “I believe we should leave now.” “Me, too!”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I think this movie is fantastic!” “Me too!”
  • “I believe we should leave now.” “Me too!”

Explanation: When you want to emphasize your agreement or make it stand out more, adding a comma can create a slight pause, adding emphasis. However, this is more a matter of stylistic choice than a strict grammatical rule.

Rule 3: In Written Communication

Correct Usage:

  • In emails or formal texts, it’s safer to avoid “Me too” or “Me, too” and use a full sentence: “I agree with you.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • Using “Me too” or “Me, too” in formal writing without considering the formality of the context.

Explanation: Formal communication typically requires more explicit expressions of agreement or sentiment.

Rule 4: When Responding to Negative Statements

Correct Usage:

  • “I don’t like being in the cold.” “Me neither.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I don’t like being in the cold.” “Me too.”

Explanation: “Me too” is incorrect in response to negative statements. Use “Me neither” to agree with negative sentiments.

Rule 5: Adding Information for Clarity

Correct Usage:

  • “I’ve visited Paris.” “Me too, last summer.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I’ve visited Paris.” “Me, too last summer.”

Explanation: When adding information to your agreement, “Me too” is used without a comma before the additional information.

Rule 6: Emphasizing Personal Experience

Read More: Is There a Comma After “Currently”?

Correct Usage:

  • “I’ve always wanted to learn piano.” “Me, too. I started lessons last year.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I’ve always wanted to learn piano.” “Me too I started lessons last year.”

Explanation: A comma can be used when “Me, too” is followed by a separate sentence that adds to the initial agreement.

Rule 7: Agreement in Lists

Correct Usage:

  • “I enjoy hiking, swimming, and biking.” “Me too.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I enjoy hiking, swimming, and biking.” “Me, too.”

Explanation: When agreeing with a list of items or activities, “Me too” is typically used without a comma.

Rule 8: In Casual vs. Formal Speech

Correct Usage:

  • Casual: “I’m craving pizza.” “Me too.”
  • Formal: “I also have a craving for pizza.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • Formal: “I’m craving pizza.” “Me, too.”

Explanation: The use of “Me too” or “Me, too” is more appropriate for casual conversation, with “Me too” being the more common choice.

Rule 9: With Emotive Expressions

Correct Usage:

  • “I’m so excited for the concert!” “Me too!”
  • “I’m really worried about the exam.” “Me too.”

Incorrect Usage:

  • “I’m so excited for the concert!” “Me, too!”
  • “I’m really worried about the exam.” “Me, too.”

Explanation: In responses that convey emotion, “Me too” without a comma conveys a more immediate and connected feeling.

Rule 10: Clarity and Brevity

Correct Usage:

  • For clarity and brevity in communication, “Me too” is preferred.

Incorrect Usage:

  • Overusing “Me, too” for brief agreements.

Explanation: “Me too” is generally preferred for its simplicity and directness in agreeing with others.

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